A closed sign in Macy's at Salem Center. (Saphara Harrell/Salem Reporter)

Day by day across Salem, doors are locked, lights go out and more people find they are without a job.

Still, key businesses continue to function to keep the community fed and fueled. Grocers and hardware stores, some putting on extra help, are still up and running. Restaurants, adjusting to no dining, keep going with sometimes slimmed down staffing and to go orders.

Changes could become more pronounced on Monday, when Gov. Kate Brown is expected to announce new measures to slow the spread of COVID-19. Portland-area mayors and the state's key medical associations are pressing her to shut down Oregon by telling Oregonians to stay home but for essential chores.

Photos by Saphara Harrell and Rachel Alexander of Salem Reporter.

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A closed sign at American Eagle at Salem Center. (Saphara Harrell/Salem Reporter)

Ulta Beauty temporarily closed its location at the Willamette Town Center. (Saphara Harrell/Salem Reporter)

Many restaurants are offering takeout orders after a ban on dining in at eateries went into effect on Tuesday, March 17. (Saphara Harrell/Salem Reporter)

Normally a lively gathering space, Ike Box has closed the doors to its central room and is serving coffee to-go only. (Rachel Alexander/Salem Reporter)

JC Penney has a sign in front of its shuttered down that said it plans to re-open on April 2. (Saphara Harrell/Salem Reporter)

The Kitchen on Court Street advertises orders to-go on Thursday, March 19. (Saphara Harrell/Salem Reporter)

A sign in the window of Coin Jam on March 17, 2020 announcing a closure during the COVID-19 pandemic (Rachel Alexander/Salem Reporter)

A sign in the window of Gov Cup on March 17, 2020 announcing a closure during the COVID-19 pandemic (Rachel Alexander/Salem Reporter)

Capitol Coffee is offering carryout orders. (Saphara Harrell/Salem Reporter)

A sign in the Salem Center that advises shoppers to wash their hands. (Saphara Harrell/Salem Reporter)

The Capitol closed its doors until further notice on March 18. (Saphara Harrell/Salem Reporter)

Bath and Body Works in the Willamette Town Center was closed. (Saphara Harrell/Salem Reporter)

Bo and Vine is offering takeout after dining in at restaurants has been banned for the next month. (Saphara Harrell/Salem Reporter)

Macy's announced it would close its stores across the country until March 31. (Saphara Harrell/Salem Reporter)

Center 50+, a city-run senior center, closed on Monday, March 16, and is providing takeout meals for seniors. (Saphara Harrell/Salem Reporter)

The Book Bin is offering free curbside pickup or home delivery of books. (Saphara Harrell/Salem Reporter)

Salem's downtown during the lunch hour on Thursday, March 19. (Saphara Harrell/Salem Reporter)

Game Stop is only allowing a certain number of customers into the store at a time. (Saphara Harrell/Salem Reporter)

Marco Ristorante Italiano is offering takeout orders at its downtown restaurant. (Saphara Harrell/Salem Reporter)

The Salem Center had many stores temporarily close to help slow the spread of COVID-19. (Saphara Harrell/Salem Reporter)

Salem installed 15-minute parking signs for restaurant patrons picking up to-go orders. (Saphara Harrell/Salem Reporter)

Kids still attending preschool at the Oregon Child Development Coalitions' North Lancaster Drive center are learning about the covornavirus outbreak through activities focused on health and germs. (Rachel Alexander/Salem Reporter)

A classroom at the Oregon Child Development Coalition's preschool on North Lancaster Drive would normally hold about 20 kids. Attendance has been down sharply over the past week, as shown by this sign from Friday, March 20 (Rachel Alexander/Salem Reporter)